Procedures:

Total Knee Replacement

Subvastus total knee replacement

Total Hip Replacement

Minimally invasive hip replacement surgery

Minimally invasive total hip replacement

Total knee replacement

What is Total Knee Replacement ?

 A total knee replacement is a surgical procedure whereby the diseased knee joint is replaced with artificial material. The knee is a hinge joint that provides motion at the point where the thigh meets the lower leg. The thighbone (or femur) abuts the large bone of the lower leg (tibia) at the knee joint. During a total knee replacement, the end of the femur bone is removed and replaced with a metal shell. The end of the lower leg bone (tibia) is also removed and replaced with a channeled plastic piece with a metal stem. Depending on the condition of the kneecap portion of the knee joint, a plastic "button" may also be added under the kneecap surface. The artificial components of a total knee replacement are referred to as the prosthesis. 

What is SUBVASTUS total knee replacement ?

 A key factor in minimally invasive knee surgery is protecting and preserving muscles. This is particularly true for knee joint replacement or resurfacing. The muscles provide strength and control of your knee. The muscles are also an important factor in regaining motion. As you would expect, not cutting or detaching muscles around the knee results in LESS PAIN, BETTER MOTION & FASTER RECOVERY.

 

Left:  Parapatellar knee incision (red line); vastus medialis muscle is detached from quadriceps tendon;

Center:  Midvastus knee incision; vastus medialis muscle is partially split (short red line)

Right:  The subvastus approach is a truly “quadriceps-sparing” surgical technique. The entire quadriceps muscle is left intact. As you would expect, patients who have a total or partial knee replacement with the subvastus approach have less pain, better muscle control and overall faster recovery.

Components of a Total Knee:

 

Implants are made of metal alloys, or strong plastic parts. Up to three bone surfaces may be replaced in a total knee replacement:


  • The lower end of the femur. The metal femoral component curves around the end of the femur (thighbone). It is grooved so the kneecap can move up and down smoothly against the bone as the knee bends and straightens.


  • The top surface of the tibia. The tibial component is typically a flat metal platform with a cushion of strong, durable plastic, called polyethylene. Some designs do not have the metal portion and attach the polyethylene directly to the bone. For additional stability, the metal portion of the component may have a stem that inserts into the center of the tibia bone.
  • The back surface of the patella. The patellar component is a dome-shaped piece of polyethylene that duplicates the shape of the patella (kneecap). In some cases, the patella does not need to be resurfaced.

Total hip replacement

What is Total Hip Replacement:

 A total hip replacement is a surgical procedure whereby the diseased cartilage and bone of the hip joint is surgically replaced with artificial materials. The normal hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The socket is a "cup-shaped" component of the pelvis called the acetabulum. The ball is the head of the thighbone (femur). Total hip joint replacement involves surgical removal of the diseased ball and socket and replacing them with a metal (or ceramic) ball and stem inserted into the femur bone and an artificial plastic (or ceramic) cup socket. The metallic artificial ball and stem are referred to as the "femoral prosthesis" and the plastic cup socket is the "acetabular prosthesis." Upon inserting the prosthesis into the central core of the femur, it is fixed with a bony cement called methylmethacrylate. Alternatively, a "cementless" prosthesis is used that has microscopic pores which allow bony ingrowth from the normal femur into the prosthesis stem. This "cementless" hip is felt to have a longer duration and is considered especially for younger patients. Total hip replacement is also referred to as total hip arthroplasty. 

Components of Total Hip:

 Total hip joint replacement involves surgical removal of the diseased ball and socket and replacing them with a metal (or ceramic) ball and stem inserted into the femur bone and an artificial plastic (or ceramic) cup socket. The metallic artificial ball and stem are referred to as the "femoral prosthesis" and the plastic cup socket is the "acetabular prosthesis." Upon inserting the prosthesis into the central core of the femur, it is fixed with a bony cement called methylmethacrylate. Alternatively, a "cementless" prosthesis is used that has microscopic pores which allow bony ingrowth from the normal femur into the prosthesis stem. This "cementless" hip is felt to have a longer duration and is considered especially for younger patients.